Nature Invented it First

By Jane Naberhuis, University of Illinois As a researcher that works in a neonatal intensive care unit, I am required to get an annual flu shot. As the syringe was piercing my arm this year, I found myself thinking back to a paper I read recently about the structure of porcupine quills[1]. North American porcupine…

A Note on Scientific Ethics

By Irving Miramontes, University of Texas El Paso In the past few months, the scientific community has been reminded of the importance of ethics. On the 30th of January, two Nature papers were published by scientists in the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, Japan. These papers were on a novel technique in which…

(Bio)Hackers: Taking Over a Body Near You

By Matthew Munson With the rise of digital computing and technology in the 21st century, scientists have made advancements that would have seemed like the work of science-fiction just a few decades ago.  One of modern technology’s most important advancements for the scientific community is the ability to instantly share information  from the comfort of…

The Darker Side of Science

By Jane Naberhuis Halloween is here and dead bodies, murder, and all things that go bump in the night are on our minds. If you’ve never heard of William Burke and William Hare, it’s time you heard about these nefarious individuals who made their own creepy contributions to the early study of anatomy. The field…

ASBMB members on the new MCAT

In the Spring issue of Enzymatic, we asked ASBMB members who teach undergraduate biochemistry/molecular biology about their perspectives on the changes to the MCAT starting in 2015 and what (if anything) their departments are doing to prepare for the upcoming changes.  Responses came in from Craig Streu, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry at St. Mary’s College…